Mark Gould

Artwork

A Natural Path: Alamosa 2103

Mark Gould

A Natural Path: Alamosa 2103

acrylic on panel

32 x 44 in (81.28 x 111.76 cm)

$4,500

My Neighbor's House 2118

Mark Gould

My Neighbor's House 2118

acrylic on panel

22 x 19 in (55.88 x 48.26 cm)

$1,700

My Neighbor's House:  Orchard 2020

Mark Gould

My Neighbor's House: Orchard 2020

acylic on panel

28 x 24 in (71.12 x 60.96 cm)

original price $3,000 PROMO $1,200

Mystic Stream:  Alamosa 2140

Mark Gould

Mystic Stream: Alamosa 2140

acrylic on panel

32 x 26 in (81.28 x 66.04 cm)

$3,900

Rio Grande Warmth: Alamosa 2124

Mark Gould

Rio Grande Warmth: Alamosa 2124

acrylic on panel

22 x 18 in (55.88 x 45.72 cm)

$2,700

Secret Spring: Alamosa 2145

Mark Gould

Secret Spring: Alamosa 2145

acrylic on panel

22 x 18 in (55.88 x 45.72 cm)

$2,700

Suddenly Color I: Arcadian 2093

Mark Gould

Suddenly Color I: Arcadian 2093

acrylic on panel

38 x 32 in (96.52 x 81.28 cm)

$3,900

The Journey II: Alamosa 2090

Mark Gould

The Journey II: Alamosa 2090

acrylic on panel

17 x 21 in (43.18 x 53.34 cm)

original price $2,700 PROMO $1,080

Toward a Meadow: Arcadian 2083

Mark Gould

Toward a Meadow: Arcadian 2083

acrylic on panel

17 x 21 in (43.18 x 53.34 cm)

$2,700

Up Above: Alamosa, 2019

Mark Gould

Up Above: Alamosa, 2019

acrylic on panel

32 x 32 in (81.28 x 81.28 cm)

$4,700

Valley and River: Alamosa 2138

Mark Gould

Valley and River: Alamosa 2138

acrylic on panel

16 x 13 in (40.64 x 33.02 cm)

$1,600

Zapata's Blue Mountain: Arcadian 2075

Mark Gould

Zapata's Blue Mountain: Arcadian 2075

acrylic on panel

18 x 22 in (45.72 x 55.88 cm)

original price $2,700 PROMO $1,080

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Mark Gould
Mark Gould received a Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Art from the University of Iowa and then embarked on his own “personally challenging peregrination of creativity”. During moves to Colorado and then New Mexico he continued his studies in advanced/graduate classes at three state universities, one private university, and two private art institutes as well as a number of artist-retreats. A personal artistic vision evolved during these years of rough-shod art-making, as the psychologically liberating aspects of his studio work became his greater priority. He states: “I no longer need the requirements of realistic portrayal in my artwork. Realism can be a good - but harsh - master. I’m grateful for all my previous exposure to a variety of traditions as they provide critical art-making skills that I still use to experiment and advance. But now I like to imagine I’m constructing my personal “fortress of creativity” - if you will. Not an actual edifice, but a mindset where I explore my own ideas and use a liberating aesthetic approach that works specifically for me. I’ll never complete this construction, but I’ll have a blast trying - and I’ll make good art in the attempt.”
https://cdn.artcld.com/img/w_400,h_400,c_fill/v6ueren1q1k3w6t5m8ya.jpg
Artist